Vacuum Cleaner Buying Guide

Vacuum Cleaner Buying Guide

The visibility of vacuum lines on carpets gives a cleaner feeling to clean house. What if you can have dust-free, gleaming floors all the time?

Wouldn’t it be amazing?

Whether you are a flooring fanatic, pile passionate, or love having both a bit, a good vacuum cleaner will be your best friend. We have personally shortlisted models which can motor about 16miles of flooring and carpet for finding and selecting the best vacuum cleaners. Before you can check the guide for buying, you should know which type you are voting.

Types of Vacuum Cleaners

You can quickly decide the type you want if we know which type you want your house to be cleaned. If having lots of uprights, rugs, wall-to-wall carpeting, you can do overall.

Upright, Stick, Canister, Robotic, Handheld, Wet & dry are the most popular vacuum cleaners in the market.

But, if you have tile floors, hardwood, stairs, laminate then canisters will be an excellent choice to stick to.

Hand-held and stick vacuums are lightweight & it make a perfect choice for comparatively lighter tasks needing immediate attention. A lightweight vacuum will also be helpful for the elderly adults or people with back pain or other health issues. A robotic for the crowd with set-it-and-go. And, central vacuums preferably if you can go for the commitment of installation.

What are the things to consider before you buy a Lightweight Vacuum?

You have a lot many choices and design ranges to choose from, shapes, and colors too. But, before the design, you should mainly know how they do the cleaning. An appealing vacuum doesn’t guarantee you of the cleaning tasks.

Pet owners can choose Canister and Upright vacuum cleaners since they do a marvelous job on picking off the pet hair.

Check Features

Vacuum cleaners having motorized brush will clean the carpet in a better way compared to the powered by suction. The brush which deactivates upon switch will be helpful in finishing the bare floors and will avoid scattering. Models with manual control of adjustment and suction will be good for cleaning draperies and delicate materials.

Bagless or Bagged

You can skip the cost included with bags purchase if you go for bagless vacuum cleaners, but they will-will need more filters and a periodic cleanup or replacement of filters. It can be a genuine concern if you have dust allergies or asthma for emptying the dust off bins.

Try before taking

You can order online but visit a store before. Try on the vacuum cleaners considered, push them, pull, lift, and turn. Check out their features and controls. Compare to the online price, and see if the store is matching.

Noise during the cleaning

Most of the cleaners wouldn’t reach a level of noise recommended for protection, but vacuum gets louder in a closed room which echoes, like a bathroom. Canister vacuums are less noisy.

Look out for Season Offers and Sales

Holiday season offers discounts and is available up to 30% discounts. You wouldn’t have to wait for massive brands because they will be offering discounts occasionally. Try checking in their online store, or sign up with the manufacturer, or subscribe for receiving coupons and upcoming products.

I recommend you to go through this guide for getting the best vacuum cleaner in the market. Happy Shopping!

Repeal Project

Interviewed by Geraldine Carton

The images and jumpers have probably made their way to your feeds over the past few months, but the message has been at the forefront of our minds for years. Repeal Project seeks to bring the repeal the 8th campaign to a wider audience and raise funds for Abortion Rights Campaign in Ireland through the sale of jumpers bearing the simple and powerful insignia ‘Repeal’. It’s an old fundraising trick, but a solid one, since already demand for the jumpers has gone worldwide even though the project has yet to launch.

As part of a new series of interviews with creatives and activists we’ll be running here at Guts, it seems only appropriate to start with the woman behind the campaign that has captured the anger and the protest that we ourselves have felt over recent years.

We spoke to the wonderful Anna Cosgrave ahead of the official launch of Repeal Project this evening in Indigo & Cloth in Dublin.

Why did you set up Repeal Project?

I set it up because I feel I need to vindicate the rights of Irish women in the face of a constitutional ban on abortion which I believe is inhumane and barbaric. I wanted to reflect the public opinion and deflect the political discourse as it just was not telling of the real life situation.

In one sentence what is the purpose of Repeal Project?

It’s an outerwear project meant to give voice to a hidden problem

Was there any particular moment that motivated you to take on this project?

It was the vigil for Savita Halappanavar in 2012, and it was seeing Gloria Steinem wear a t-shirt saying “I had an abortion”.

What’s been your experience wearing these jumpers around Dublin?

Overwhelmingly positive. People are dying to be able to engage because this is a conversation that has been shrouded in so much guilt and stigma over the years. Wearing the jumper is like when we wore the badges for YES equality, there’s this little reaction, this smirk of solidarity.

How would you describe – the current state of Ireland with this ruling in place; the potential rejection of the repeal; the potential passing of the repeal?

Currently it’s inhumane, barbaric and unfair. If it passes, it will be the right thing, it will be fair, and about time. If it is not passed it’s stilted and disappointing, but it’s still progress because at least we’ve opened up the discourse.

What have been the best and the worst experiences to come out of this project for you?

The best is knowing that you’re going to be on the right side of history and seeing how many people actually want this to happen. The worst is just being worried about standing up and standing out. There’s definitely been a few moments where I’ve felt grossly nervous.

If you could have any one person walking around wearing your jumper, who would it be?

It would be someone who I actually haven’t met, a woman who has made the lonely journey, or someone who finds comfort in knowing that this subject is now being talked about.

Repeal Project launches on June 30th, 7pm at Indigo&Cloth, Temple Bar. A pop-up shop will be in Indigo&Cloth from July 1-3.

Sally Rooney

Interview by Ellen Tannam and portrait by Jonny L. Davies

We spoke to the author of Conversations With Friends about likeability, Meg Rosoff and communism jokes

What made you want to write a book?

In a way, I didn’t really decide to write a book – I had an idea for a short story and it just spiralled out of control. I never sat down at my laptop and thought “okay, today’s the day, I’m going to become a novelist.” But I had always vaguely planned to write a book at some point in my life so I was glad to catch myself in the act of doing so.

How did you come to writing Conversations with Friends in particular? Was there anything that sparked the impetus for you to write it?

For me, ideas always spring from characters and dynamics – everything else arrives later and takes a bit more working out. So this book began with the idea of two college students, former girlfriends, who befriend a married couple. The central four characters came to me pretty much fully formed, and actually the opening pages remain almost completely intact from the very first draft.

This sounds trite, but whose work do you find inspiring – not even necessarily aspirational. Who do you enjoy? Writers, actors, musicians, friends, dogs…

Not trite at all! If anything, too difficult. When I’m in the middle of writing a book (which I am now, and have been almost continuously since 2014…!) I find it difficult to really, truly enjoy the work of other contemporary writers – either I get impatient and want to go back to work, or I get jealous and disheartened. So, lately I’ve been reading Sarah Ruden’s translation of Virgil’s Aeneid, which I’m finding profoundly beautiful and moving.

I also like visual art a lot, though I have no academic background in art history and don’t really understand much about it.

“I like small, intimate paintings of people talking or getting dressed. I go pretty frequently to the National Gallery to see Pierre Bonnard’s “Boy Eating Cherries” – that little boy just gets me.

Like most normal people I listen to a lot of music. While I was doing the final edits on this book last summer I was really into the Frankie Cosmos album “Next Thing” – it’s a great record, very funny and dark, and I think it gave me some useful guidance.

The book is a lot of the time really witty, what kind of sense of humour do you love/hate?

Thank you! It’s hard to say what I do and don’t find funny – I feel like I’m surprised a lot of the time by what makes me laugh. I do like the absurd communist humour on Twitter, though sometimes I wonder if the absurdities of capitalism are in fact too grim to be amusing. Still, life is a hard thing to be sincere about, so I think it’s better to be funny right up until the point you’re ready to be sincere.

“I do like the absurd communist humour on Twitter, though sometimes I wonder if the absurdities of capitalism are in fact too grim to be amusing.

 Still, life is a hard thing to be sincere about, so I think it’s better to be funny right up until the point you’re ready to be sincere.

What are your hopes for after this book?

I hope to finish my second book. A third book would be nice at some point but I’m trying to keep it realistic.

What has been the most enjoyable part of the process of writing a novel?

I know many writers find the act of writing immensely difficult and arduous, but for me it’s a lot of fun. I enjoyed almost every day I spent with this book, and I feel very grateful for that.

What do you do for fun?

I draw (badly), and I can play music and sing a little. I am a casual observer of the Premier League and a keen tidier of my own house.

What was your favourite book as a kid?

I read Meg Rosoff’s “How I Live Now” when I was thirteen or fourteen and it totally blew me away. For years afterward, everything I wrote reached back to that book in one way or another. I should give it another go – I’m sure it would surprise me all over again.

I liked the book because obviously there was definitely a plot, but it existed more so as a way for you to explore the characters – do you enjoy getting to know the people you are writing? In particular, when they might not be necessarily likeable?

In all honesty, I’ve been surprised to hear that so many readers find the central characters unlikeable. To me, my protagonists always seem like good people in difficult situations.

Maybe this means I myself am an unlikeable person (highly probable), or that I have an unusually high tolerance for bad behaviour. But of course, I made these characters up, so the least I can do is go to bat for them. They have changed my life, after all.

CONVERSATIONS WITH FRIENDS IS OUT ON MAY 30TH